Snow Canyon State Park

If you are planning a trip to southern Utah, I would recommend visiting Snow Canyon, State Park. I was drawn to the park because of its unusual geological features- 27,000 years ago there was an active volcano. Also, many of the hikes are family friendly such as slotted canyon Jenny’s Canyon. If you are in the area do not miss it.

Snow Canyon State Park

Discover the majestic beauty of Snow Canyon State Park, just nine miles north of St. George along highway 18. Notorious for its unique geological features, Snow Canyon State Park is comprised of volcanic cones, sand dunes, deep red sandstone cliffs, and twisted layers of rock. The scenery is so spectacular it has been the backdrop for Hollywood movies including The Electric Horseman and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid! Campsites cost $16 for tents, $20 for RVs. Pets are allowed if kept on a leash in the campground and on West Canyon Road and Whiptail Trail only.

Opened to the public as a Utah State Park in 1962.Petrified Sand Dunes 2

Snow Canyon State Park is a 7,400-acre scenic park quietly tucked amid lava flows and soaring sandstone cliffs in a strikingly colorful and fragile desert environment. Majestic views and the subtle interplay of light, shadow, and color dancing across canyon walls evoke strong emotional responses from visitors.

Located in the 62,000 acre Red Cliffs Desert Reserve, established to protect the federally listed desert tortoise and its habitat, the park offers opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages. Activities include hiking, nature studies, wildlife viewing, photography, camping, ranger talks, and junior ranger programs. There are more than 38 miles of hiking trails, a three-mile paved walking/biking trail, and over 15 miles of equestrian trails.

Park History
Created in 1959, Snow Canyon has a long history of human use. Anasazi Indians inhabited the region from A.D. 200 to 1250, utilizing the canyon for hunting and gathering. Paiute Indians used the canyon from A.D. 1200 to the mid-1800s. Mormon pioneers discovered Snow Canyon in the 1850’s while searching for lost cattle. Modern-day the canyon has been the site of Hollywood films such as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Electric Horseman, and Jeremiah Johnson. Originally called Dixie State Park, it was later renamed for Lorenzo and Erastus Snow, prominent pioneering Utah leaders.

Geology

Transported by wind more than 183 million years ago, tiny grains of quartzite sand covered much of what we now call Utah. These sand dunes, up to 2,500 feet thick, eventually were cemented into stone. Burnt orange to creamy white in color, Navajo sandstone, the predominant rock in the park, is what remains of the ancient desert sand sea. Over time, water has cut and shaped the sandstone to form canyons. Approximately 1.4 million years ago, and as recently as 27,000 years ago, nearby cinder cones erupted, causing lava to flow down these canyons, filling them with basalt. This redirected ancient waterways, eventually carving new canyons. Look up from within the park to see lava-capped ridges that were once canyon bottoms. Removal of rocks and minerals is prohibited.

For more information about Snow Canyon please visit this page. 

Source: Snow Canyon State Park

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