Voigtlander FE Heliar-Hyper Wide 10mm f/5.6 Aspherical Lens

I just purchased the Voigtlander FE Heliar-Hyper Wide 10mm f/5.6 Aspherical Lens for one purpose: to be able to do close focus panoramas. This lens is like no other: it is a rectilinear lens with a field of view  130°.

Images for this article were taken with the Roundshot VR Drive and Sony A7S.

I used Really Right Stuff TVC-34 tripod and TVC-32G ground tripod- both fitted with TA-3 leveling bases. The VR Drive is outfitted with an RRS dovetail plate, and the Sony A7S is equipped with an RRS L-plate.

The VR Drive requires a nodal rail, and for this lens needs the RRS MPR-CL (the short bar)- with this lens the longer MRP-CL II bar would be visible.

The lens pupil must be determined, and given the extreme wide angle of view, it is expected to be near the front of the lens. The lens pupil was 4 mm from the small front lip of the lens. This translated to 70 mm on the RRS nodal rail.

With aperture set to f/16, the hyperfocal distance is 0.21 m. The depth of field runs from 0.1 m to infinity.

The Roundshot VR Drive was programmed for a cylindrical panorama at  360° X 150° with a 3 bracket exposure. This resulted in two rows of 6 images: 12 images each exposure of -2ev, 0ev, and +2ev. Hence, each panorama is a composite of 36 images.

The first panorama was taken indoors:

The Living Room Panorama Shot With Voigtlander 10mm February 18t

Living Room With February 18th, 2017. GPS 47°25’4″ N 122°20’37” W.

 

 

I took the next 4 images in the garden:

In The Green House Panorama February 19th 2017: Panorama Image &

The Green House February 19th, 2017. GPS 47°25’5″ N 122°20’35” W

In The Bushes Panorama February 19th 2017: Panorama Image & HDR

In The Bushes February 19th, 2017. GPS 47°25’5″ N 122°20’35” W

In The Bushes Panorama February 19th 2017: Panorama Image & HDR

In The Bushes B&W

Observatory Panorama February 19th 2017: Panorama Image & HDR Im

The Observatory February 19th, 2017: GPS 47°25’5″ N 122°20’36” W

 

It is now time to push the lens and the stitching software to its limit: the extremely close focus panorama. And no place better is the inside of the GMC Denali.

In Side The GMC Denali Panorama 1 February 21sh 2017: Panorama I

Inside GMC Denali February 21st, 2017. GPS 47°25’4″ N 122°20’37” W

In Side The GMC Denali Panorama 2 February 21sh 2017: Panorama I

Inside GMC Denali Doors Closed

In Side The GMC Denali Panorama 3 February 21sh 2017: Panorama I

Inside GMC Denali Doors Open

In Side The GMC Denali Panorama 4 February 21sh 2017: Panorama I

Inside GMC Denali Looking Out The Back

In Side The GMC Denali Panorama 4 February 21sh 2017: Panorama I

Inside GMC Denali Looking Out The Back And Front

In Side The GMC Denali Panorama 5 February 21sh 2017: Panorama I

Outside GMC Denali Hood Up

 

The first 5 images posed no difficulty in stitching, as they did not have to focus too closely. However, the inside of the Denali panoramas gave the stitching software fits, and neither Autopano Giga or PTgui could render images that needed no post adjustments. The car’s dome lights reflected off the lens (depending on its position) and caused various image spotlighting.

I recommend this lens if you are looking to do panoramas that have a minimum focus of 100 mm, and are willing to work with the stitching software and handle any post-processing.

All images can be reviewed on Flickr.

 

 

 

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